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Historical Background of Power Development in Nepal

Historical Background of Power Development in Nepal

S.N. Hydropower Plant Capacity of the Plant Constructed Date Description
1. Pharping 500KW 1911 AD Constructed to supply the power to Singa Durbar and other Rana family house hold. It was constructed to Kathmandu by 12km of 11KV line.
2. Sundarijal 900KW 1935 AD Constructed to supply the power to the public. The frequency level of this station was changed from 60 Hz to 50 Hz in 2020 B.S
3. Letang 1600KW 1939/40 AD It was constructed by electrical engineer Padma Sundar Malla to supply the power to industries and to the pubic.
4. Panauti 2400KW 1965 AD It was constructed with an assistance of USSR government.
5. Trishuli 12MW 1964/68 AD It was constructed with the assistance of government of india to provide electricity in Bagmati and Narayani corridor.
6. Phewa 100KW 1969 AD It was constructed in pokhara with the grant assistance of Government of India.
7. Devighat 14MW 1983 AD It was also constructed with the grant assistance of India.
8. Sunkoshi 10 MW 1973 AD It was constructed with the assistance of Government of China.
9. Kulekhani-I 60MW 1982 AD It was constructed with the loan assistance of Government of Japan and other multilateral agencies.
10. Kulekhani-II 32MW 1986 AD It was also constructed with the loan assistance of Government of Japan and other multilateral agencies.
11. Marsyangdi 60 MW 1989 AD It was constructed with the loan assistance of Germany, Japan, Kuwait and other multilateral agencies.
12. Kaligandaki-A 144MW 2002 AD It was constructed by NEA with the loan assistance of OECE Japan, ADB and joint funding of Government of Nepal and NEA.
13. Middle Marsyangdi 70MW 2008 AD It was launched by NEA with the grant assistance of Germany.

Power Potential in Nepal and world: Gross Potential, Technical Potential and Economic Potential

  • Power Potential in Nepal
    Nepal is considered as the second richest country in the world in terms of availability of water after Brasil. There are around 6000 rivers and rivulets. The annual rainfall in Nepal is 1530mm in average(According to DHM). This shows the tremendous energy potential for the generation of the hydropower in Nepal.
    • Gross Potential
      Gross potential is the power which is theoretically possible to generate. The river basin is divided into several cascades. Based on the head and hydrograph of the particular cascade, the power can be calculated. Then, the total power in the river basin can be calculated by using the following relation:
      Where,
      P= Power in KW
      Γ= specific weight of the water
      Q= Discharge in m3/s
      H= Net head in m
      n=number of cascades
      The estimated gross potential of Nepal( according to Dr. Hari Man Shrestha’s thesis) is 83000 MW.
    • Technical Potential
      Due to the various constraints like unfavorable geology, topography, accessibility, climatic condition etc.; all the theoretically possible power in nature cannot be produced. So the power which is technically possible to produce is known as technical potential. Out of 83000 MW gross potential, Technically potential power of Nepal is about 44000MW.
    • Economic Potential
      The potential computed from the economically feasible projects is known as economic potential. The projects are usually considered economically feasible if the internal rate of return (IRR) is higher than the prevailing interest rate and the benefit/cost ratio(BCR ratio) is more than unity.
    • Power Potential in World
      The total installed HP capacity worldwide is around 740 GW and the energy produced annually is 2770 TWh. The gross theoretical annual production range worldwide for primary hydropower is over 40000 TWh of which about 14000 TWh is found to be technically feasible. Most of the remaining potential hydropower is in South America, Asia and Africa.

Region-Wise Economically Feasible Potential Energy and Generated Hydropower Energy in the World

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Largest Hydropower Plant in the World

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